Explore the Fairbanks Airport

Art installations and points of interest in and around the Fairbanks International Airport. Back to the Guide.

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Explore the Fairbanks Airport

Near the Air­port Way Entrance you can see the art­work hang­ing on the wall, Birch Forest”. 

Sto­ry of the Beads” can be found hang­ing near the Admin Offices. 

Near the Admin Offices you can see the oil paint­ing, Geese in Cream­er’s Field”. 

This pho­to­graph was tak­en in 1916

This pho­to­graph is from 1923

This repli­ca is from 1987

Head­ing Out” can be found hung near the Admin Offices. 

This repli­ca is from 1987

This pho­to­graph can be found near the Concessions. 

A series of Alaskan wilder­ness and moun­tain scenes can be sought out if you enter the hall­way that takes you to the lost and found office from the wait­ing area of Era Alas­ka on the first floor of the main terminal. 

First Snow Smith Lake” by Kesler Wood­ward is direct­ly oppo­site the jet­way of Gate 1, in the south­east cor­ner of the main ter­mi­nal on the sec­ond floor. 

Globe Trot­ters” a lay­ered quilt by Karin Franzen hangs in the stair­way that takes you to the Air­port Admin­is­tra­tion Office. 

Long Day, Long Night” is a stained glass piece by Ann Gard­ner. It hangs above the dis­play case in the main terminal. 

Luck Strings” by Sonya Kel­li­her-Combs is locat­ed near gates 1 and 2 on the sec­ond floor of the main terminal. 

Low­er Yukon Eski­mo Group” was cre­at­ed by Tony Rubey. 

Migra­tion” by Mark Fejes and Ron Senunge­tuk is a sculp­ture made from met­al with a con­crete base. It is out­side the ter­mi­nal, in front of the main entrance. 

This col­lec­tion, named Over Frozen Ice Break” by Hal Gage is found hang­ing on the west wall adja­cent to Gate 3

This pho­to­graph was tak­en in 1920

Near the con­ces­sions you will see Bull moose feeds in Won­der Lake” hung on the wall. 

The World Time Clock” hangs near the con­ces­sion stand 

Sky with Cumu­lus” is a piece of art­work dis­played in the main ter­mi­nal. It is made from ceram­ic tile on wood, by artist Pol­ly Lee. 

Tanana Riv­er”, a paint­ing by David Mol­lett, hangs on the south wall of the wait­ing area for Era Alas­ka, on the first floor of the main terminal. 

Tanana” is a piece made from stain­less steel and glass by artist David Ruth. It can be viewed while you are descend­ing through the secu­ri­ty exit from the sec­ond floor to bag­gage claim. 

Near Gate 5 you can see the repli­ca paint­ed in 1987 of a pho­to tak­en in 1917 , A Ruby Fam­i­ly’s Portrait”. 

The 50 Years of State­hood Mark­er can be found in the far south­west cor­ner (next to bag­gage claim 2) on the first floor of the main terminal. 

Cari­bou tracks like this one can been seen through­out the ter­mi­nal. You can see some between the secu­ri­ty exit and bag­gage claim, on the first floor of the main terminal. 

The columns you see through­out the ter­mi­nal are made of con­crete, but were poured into a cast cre­at­ed from wood­en boards to evoke a nat­ur­al aesthetic. 

Four his­toric pho­tographs (in full series of eight) are locat­ed on the south wall near Gates 4 and 5 on the sec­ond floor of the main ter­mi­nal. The oth­er four are locat­ed on the east wall adja­cent to Gate 4

A series of Alaskan inu­it chil­dren por­traits can be found in Gate A. 

A series of four panoram­ic Alaskan pho­tographs are found above the secu­ri­ty entrance and exit, look­ing to the north on the sec­ond floor of the main ter­mi­nal. They are named North­ern Lights”, Cari­bou”, Sun­set”, and Salmon” and were pho­toraphed by Patrick Endres. 

The refur­bished air­craft Jen­ny”, an orig­i­nal air­plane first flown by Ben Eiel­son, will be sus­pend­ed above bag­gage claim 1 on the first floor of the main terminal. 

A full, mount­ed griz­zly bear can be found in the main ter­mi­nal. To view, head to the area between bag­gage claim 1 and 2 on the west end of the first floor. 

These two are locat­ed at the entrance to men’s and women’s restrooms on the sec­ond floor of the main ter­mi­nal, oppo­site the jet­way of Gate 2

Out­house 3 is a pho­to of a real Alaskan outhouse. 

Out­hous­es 5 and 6 are found at the entrance to the men’s and women’s restrooms in the wait­ing area for Era Alas­ka, on the first floor of the main terminal. 

There is a full, mount­ed polar bear in the main terminal. 

The Suite of Eight Prints” was cre­at­ed by Tony Rubey. 

A por­trait of a Native Man is found on the north wall in the wait­ing area for Era Alas­ka, on the east end of the first floor of the main terminal. 

Por­traits of Native Alaskan Chil­dren are on the north wall in the wait­ing area for Era Alas­ka, on the east end of the first floor of the main terminal. 

A sled dog and fam­i­ly por­trait is in lob­by of the Air­port Admin­is­tra­tion Office, on the sec­ond floor (fol­low signs from the first floor). 

The dinosaur park is open for 24-hour play, and is a favorite with kids. It is locat­ed in the cen­ter of the first floor of the main ter­mi­nal, just out­side the arrival area and secu­ri­ty exit. 

Win­tery Paint­ing is locat­ed on the south wall to the left of the Alas­ka Air­lines tick­et counter, on the first floor of the main terminal. 

The wolf occurs through­out Alas­ka. Their range includes about 85 per­cent of Alaska’s 586,000 square-mile area. 

The Solar Bore­alis” arch was installed in 1985 by a Cal­i­forn­ian artist.